The Smartphone addiction has got all hooked. With millions of apps catering to your different needs, smileys, emoticons and memes instead of relying on words to express what you feel and getting to know the whole world at one tap, you feel severely addicted to your Smartphone. But, is that a healthy sign? On introspection, you will probably find that you spend more time over the virtual domain through the social networking sites rather than having a heart-to-heart with your family and friends.

Of late, smartphones are being held responsible for causing depression as a result of increased isolation.

Let’s find out whether the theory is well propounded or not.

1. One of the major signs of depression is lack of adequate sleep. Sticking to your smartphone till the wee hours of the morning affects your level of concentration, resulting in anxiety and a bad temper.

2. When you spend a lot of time on the gadgets, you slowly compromise on your thinking capacity. You take everything internet serves you as granted without clarifying. With every piece of information available on the internet, there is nothing left for you to imagine or create.

3. Addiction to social networking sites is taking away all your creative potentials; and on one fine day, when you discover this, you might feel increasingly disillusioned, resulting in depression.

4. One of the worst causes of depression is cyber bullying. The virtual world might welcome you with all kinds of threats and humiliation and this happens majorly on the social networking sites. As a result, you feel your self-confidence is at stake, resulting in severely low self-esteem and subsequent depression.

5. Abandoning your smartphone completely is utopian, because they serve needful purposes as well. But, what you can do is limit the time you spend on the device and replace it with something creative. Otherwise, it might not be too late before you start silently sliding into depression.

by Dr. Vasavi Samyukta Sunki, Psychologist

Originally at

https://www.practo.com/healthfeed/be-smart-with-your-smartphone-25188/post

There are dozens of ways by which your mobile phone habits can irritate others like talking too loudly or using foul language while on phone and as so on. That is why Debrett’s have come up with the ultimate rules for mobile etiquette.

According to Debrett’s, taking calls in bed or ignoring people who are present in favour of those at the end of the line are all banned, reports the Telegraph.

Other etiquettes that should be looked out for are the following:

1. Think about what your ringtone is saying about you: head-banging rocker, fashion-conscious teenager etc. And also monitor the volume of your ringtone; if it blares out and heads turn it’s too loud.

2. If you are in doubt to use your ringtone then keep your cell phone on vibration mode.

3. Ensure that your mobile phone conversation is not disturbing other people.

4. Don’t use foul language, or talk about money, sex or bodily functions in front of witnesses when you are taking over the phone.

5. Don’t use your phone in ‘quiet zones’ on trains. If the line is bad and conversations inaudible, explain that there’s a problem and hang up.

6. Never shout if you lose reception. Ring the other person back as soon as you regain it.

7. Turn off your phone in social situations, as people with you deserve more attention than those at the end of a phone. And if you are awaiting an important call when meeting someone socially, explain at the outset that you will have to take the call, and apologise in advance.

8. Step away from the phone at meal times.

9. Don’t carry on mobile phone calls while transacting other business – in banks, shops, on buses and so on. It is insulting not to give people who are serving you your full attention.

10. Don’t make calls to people from inappropriate venues; a call from a bathroom is deeply off-putting.

Originally at http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/tech/personal-tech/computing/10-commandments-of-cellphone-etiquettes/articleshow/9505699.cms

Modern society seems convinced that social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter keep them connected and thriving socially with their friends and peers. But a new book called Alone Together by Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) professor Sherry Turkle says otherwise, purporting that social networks are more like mutual isolation networks that detach people from meaningful interactions with one another and make them less human.

“A behavior that has become typical may still express the problems that once caused us to see it as pathological,” says Turkle in her book, referring to the near-total obsession with the digital world in today’s society. She and others say that the online social world is destroying real communication, dumbing down society, and leading to a society of people that have no idea how to actually function in the real world.

Turkle emphasizes her belief that more people need to put down their phones, turn off their computers, and learn to communicate with one another face-to-face. She writes, “We have invented inspiring and enhancing technologies, yet we have allowed them to diminish us.” And many others in research and academia share her views.

One major indicator of the chilling decline in communication values is the case of Simone Back, a Brighton, U.K., woman who announced her suicide on her Facebook status. None of her more than 1,000 “friends” contacted her in response to the posting, and many simply argued with one another back and forth on her “Wall” about the legitimacy of her posting and whether or not Back had the freedom of choice to kill herself.

This sick display of meaningless Facebook “friendship” is only fuel for the fire to the many who say it represents the “writing on the wall” of worse things to come. If individuals cannot learn to interact and develop meaningful relationships outside the narcissistic, soap opera-environment of the Facebook “News Feed,” then society is in for some major trouble down the road.

Sources for this story include:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/201…

Learn more: http://www.NaturalNews.com/031128_social_networking_men…

Originally at http://news.iskcon.com/node/3401/2011-01-29/social_networking_leads_to_isolation_not_more_connections_say_academics

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